Common Grammatical Errors: Run-On Sentences

Run-on sentences join two or more complete sentences with no punctuation.

Michaela loves to draw horses she is a talented artist.

This sentence is incorrect because “Michaela loves to draw horses” and “she is a talented artist” can both stand as complete sentences. Therefore, we cannot merge them into one sentence without separating them somehow. 
When you read sentences, try to be aware of the independent clauses. When you see two in the same sentence with no punctuation you have caught a run-on sentence outlaw.

Clues: Look for two subjects within the same sentence, or a subject and a pronoun. 
We use the same method as we rehabilitate comma splices. There are five main methods of fixing run-on sentences.

1. We can separate the two clauses into two sentences.

Miranda was the lead vocalist in her band it was a punk rock band.

Miranda was the lead vocalist in her band. It was a punk rock band.

 2. We can replace the comma with a semi-colon.

Gordon laughed at Sandy's joke it was lewd.

Gordon laughed at Sandy's joke; it was lewd.

 3.  We can replace the comma with a co-ordinating conjunction (and, but, or, for, yet, nor, or so).

The night was cold we forgot to bring our coats.

The night was cold, and we forgot to bring out coats.

 4. We can replace the comma with a subordinating conjunction (e.g., after, although, before, unless, as, because, even though, if, since, until, when, while).

Maria and John like skiing Karen does not.

Although Maria and John like skiing, Karen does not.

 

5.  We can replace the comma with a semi-colon and transitional word (e.g., however, moreover, on the other hand, nevertheless, instead, also, therefore, consequently, otherwise, as a result).

I expected to pay ten dollars for the bus ride to Halifax I was wrong.

I expected to pay ten dollars for the bus ride to Halifax; however, I was wrong.